February’s Thaw

Soften snow swelters
beneath my snow shoed feet,
as sun glistens then stirs 
each brisk February season.

It’s a time of sharing hearts,
of throwing kisses in the wind,
as length of days chatter
my drowsy woodland awakens.

Icicles drip, drip, drip rhythmic
tapping upon snow, echoes the
woodpecker a symphony of sounds
down lazy land, pastoral paths.

I still my stride in hopes of more
a robin, a bumblebee, a violet;
but only red tailed fox sneaks
across my winter wonderland.

It is said, February thaw melts a
frozen heart which beats for spring;
perhaps, the earth itself groans
then chills for a bit longer

all waiting in “time out” thinking
about its care endowed to each;
hearts blown in by spring breezes
grateful to gather thawed crocus.

Poem inspired by: https://earthweal.com/2021/02/01/seasonal-changes-1-imbolc/

Then God said, “Let there be lights in the firmament of the heavens to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs and seasons, and for days and years;

Genesis 1:14

Shine on Me

Sun, mischievous child

plays hide and seek beneath clouds;

on slanted slate sky,

wintertide weather’s barrage

upsets one’s visage… come shine!

“The tanka is a thirty-one-syllable poem, traditionally written in a single unbroken line. A form of waka, Japanese song or verse, tanka translates as “short song,” and is better known in its five-line, 5/7/5/7/7 syllable count form.”

Poets.org

“Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that’s related to changes in seasons — SAD begins and ends at about the same times every year. If you’re like most people with SAD, your symptoms start in the fall and continue into the winter months, sapping your energy and making you feel moody. Less often, SAD causes depression in the spring or early summer.”

Mayo Clinic

“A quick look at the medical literature reveals that it is still unclear what causes SAD, but most experts believe it might be caused by a drop in serotonin, a brain chemical affecting mood. Reduced sun exposure can cause a drop in serotonin that might trigger depression. The change in seasons can also disrupt the balance of the natural hormone, melatonin, which hormone plays a role in sleep patterns and mood.”

Pharmacy Times


SAD = Smile And Dance

I first encountered SAD four decades ago. The first twenty years I changed light bulbs and dealt with the condition. As time has passed, there has become more of an awareness of the “lack of sun” syndrome. Along with the awareness, there are countless ways to handle the challenge.

I would assume it can be different for everyone, the effects of SAD or how to handle the situation.

About a decade ago, I started spending more time outside during our limited winter, sunny days in Wisconsin. Next, I added supplements to my diet to help increase a balance in hormones. I also purchased a dry sauna. This added light therapy and warmth. Like 130 degrees of heat on subzero days. All of this has been helpful.

Is SAD real? It’s as real as PMS, which in my early years I was told was none existent, and now it has been accepted. What else can one do in dealing with SAD? Smile and dance (SAD) knowing spring will come again!

“From the rising of the sun unto the going down of the same the LORD’S name is to be praised.”

Psalm113:3

Indian Summer

Dusk settles as dust across earthen land,

as warmth seeps slowing from woodland

stretched before me like a downed comforter.

Come warmth, come and slip between

leaf’s edges, slide down empty limbs as

luminous sun grins across the autumn sky.

Indian Summer charms man’s inner soul,

tricks the body’s brisk well being;

but the mind knows this is November!

Breathe in the last of lingering warmth;

let it radiate, resonate, regurgitate before

the killing frost returns to blanket the earth.

“Lyric night of the lingering Indian summer, Shadowy fields that are scentless but full of singing. Never a bird, but the passionless chant of insects, Ceaseless, insistent. The grasshopper’s horn, and far off, high in the maples The wheel of a locust slowly grinding the silence, Under a moon waning and worn and broken, Tired with summer.” -Sarah Teasdale

Sara Teasdale (1884-1933) was an American Poet

The perfect weather of Indian summer lengthened and lingered, warm sunny days were followed by brisk nights with Halloween a presentiment in the air.” -Wallace Stegner

Wallace Stegner (1909 –1993) was an American novelist and historian

An Indian summer is a period of unseasonably warm, dry weather that sometimes occurs in autumn in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere September to November.

This year it has come rather late in Wisconsin. Most of the trees have shed their leaves, we have endured freezing temperatures and seen a dusting of snow.

October’s Final Dance

My soul is still

as late October’s

sun glows above

fingered bare branches.

My heart is chilled

as Autumn clings

tightly to daylight.

My mind wanders…

as darken cornfields

twist, trembling their

fibrous dried stalks.

Yet, happiness comes

from chattering oaks

dancing in November.

“Let them praise His name with the dance;

Let them sing praises to Him with the timbrel and harp.”

Psalm 149:3

https://dversepoets.com/