As Time Goes By

“I remain confident of this: I will see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living. Wait for the LORD; be strong and take heart and wait for the LORD.”

Psalm 27:13-14

The coolness of the forest on a hot sunny day,
Embraces my very soul and warms my heart,
It is where I ran when you no longer breathed the breath of life.

The birds sang, as ripples of sorrow stained supple spots;
Embarrassed for the tears which lingered along the brook,
It is there grief washed away with dirt, dust and debris.

The scent of autumn leaves crackled with each sauntering steps,
Eager I was to forget, move on and leave behind my mourning;
It is what I want you to do, as it’s my turn to return to the earth.

Linked to:
https://poetsandstorytellersunited.blogspot.com/2020/09/weekly-scribblings-37-last-messages.html

Resting Place

It was ancient, their home, tall and stately. There they stood still staring through the veil of night. Waiting, wondering and watching each taking their turn while others rested. 

It was said by many, “In their dreams they sleep with the moon.” But it was of no concern for soon break of day would come. Their silhouettes would stretch wide against cloudless sky.

Silently, with massive wings they would dive to feed. Raw carrion (caribou, cougar, coyote); it made no difference to the vultures. They had waited under a pale moon dreaming of this moment.

One may wonder of their care-free lifestyle. Perhaps if a day, week or year without the work of the messy vulture we would realize their need in our communities. There are stains upon the earth and it’s a vulture’s dirty job to do a janitor’s difficult work.

The Roost

“In their dreams they sleep with the moon.”

Mary Oliver’s, Death at Wind River

Prosery Prompt at dVerse

144 words or less including the quote

Front or Back: Does it Matter?

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Books, Books, Books…

What’s in a book? Well, there’s a front, middle and back. When self-publishing an authors looks at a book in a whole new way. I came across the term Front Matter while going through KDP’s instructions. I thought, “What’s that?” It’s simple. Today I will explain the biology of a novel.

The Front Matter (first part of the book) can consists of: Title Page, Frontispiece, Accolades, Copyright Page, Dedication Page, Table of Contents, Epigraph, Preface and (or) Foreword. After all of that information an author won’t need to write a thing! Not every book has all the topics above. Some things to consider is what genre are you writing for, how much information do you want to share and what’s your personal choice? After all the book is being self-published, so the author isn’t stuck in a square peg if they happen to be a circle. There is no publisher to answer to or to help if you need questions answered.

  • Title Page, the full title with the author’s name as shown on the cover
  • Frontispiece: a illustration or photo opposite the title page on the left
  • Accolades: basically, quotes from notable people about your book… if you don’t know anyone popular don’t use them
  • Copyright Page: if you don’t have copyright yet, say pending
  • Dedication Page: the name of the person/persons the book is dedicated to and why
  • Table of Contents: chapters in your book and page numbers (it should list Front & Back Matter)
  • Epigraph: A quote regarding the subject matter (poem, song, another book, etc with permission)
  • Preface: the author’s note regarding the book (don’t give anything away!)
  • Forward: written by another person (scholar, friend, family member or someone popular)

The Body (second part of the book) is where the story takes place. But there can be extra things, including Prologue, Introduction, Chapters, Epilogue, Conclusion, and Afterword.

  • Prologue: used for fiction and sets the stage for your story
  • Introduction: used for nonfiction and tells of your subject matter
  • Chapters: hopefully, you have them already written
  • Epilogue: used for fiction and can wrap up the book (best used for series)
  • Conclusion: used for non-fiction and sums up the book’s main ideas
  • Afterword: any final thoughts

The Back Matter (the third and final part) which can contain Acknowledgements, About the Author, Copyright Permissions, Discussion Questions, Appendix, Chronology, Endnotes, Glossary, Index, or Bibliography List).

  • Acknowledgements: more “thank you’s” to those who helped
  • About the Author: a summary of your writing endeavors
  • Copyright Permissions: anything you’ve borrowed from another (song, poetry, artwork, etc)
  • Discussion Questions: academic prompts
  • Appendix: used for nonfiction to give updated information
  • Chronology: used in nonfiction (in other wards, timeline) of the list of events
  • Endnotes: supplementary notes mostly used in nonfiction
  • Glossary: definitions (words, characters or settings)
  • Index: specialty terms in alphabetical order
  • Bibliography: a list of research material used.

Does it seem overwhelming? Yep, but necessary if you decide to self-publish. This article was written by the help of Reedsy. Here is the original information…

Editing: Metamorphosis



A writer’s life is in a type of metamorphosis, as life passes by and years unfold a unique change has occurred in their writing skills. From poetry to prose, academics to artistry, or musing to marketing; all become steps toward transformation.

Writing skills are being edited as time reveals new voices in an author’s abilities. In some societies this is called progression; I’d like to think of it as a type of metamorphosis. Whether one believes in a God who over-sees all or some evaluation of life, there are changes happening daily.

It’s no different for a writer’s life. Maybe they began writing letters to a pen-pal or scribbling notes to a friend. Words grew until their skin became too tight. Then the word critter within had to be fed and fed and fed until it was fully satisfied. Finally, content with itself the writer’s words rests and waits for the next stage. While under its protective covering something special takes place. One day amazing emerges. What takes flight is a book author!

“Symbolism is the practice or art of using an object or a word to represent an abstract idea.”

Your Dictionary

“Symbolism is a literary device that uses symbols, be they words, people, marks, locations, or abstract ideas to represent something beyond the literal meaning.”

Masterclass: Writing 101

Jemi’s Noble Quest

Biblical Fiction Suited for YA and Adult Readers
Coming Soon…

Book Journey: Reedsy

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Do you remember your school years? I’m not talking about the new box of crayons, the smell of books, or even the new clothes your parents bought. Do you recall the new academic elements you struggled with and thought you’d never get a good hold on how they worked? Where did you turn? Of course an older sibling who achieved straight (A’s), your very-best friend who would do anything for you or your favorite teacher who spent time with you after school was out. Someone held your hand, that’s what Reedsy has been for me these last few weeks.

Reedsy has answered many questions for me. Granted I’m a newbie there, but so far I am advancing forward to my end goal of being self-published. What can they provide? Just about everything. In the weeks ahead I’ll cover their services. Does everything cost me something? Not everything, there are several free articles which can help a writer to understand the process of self-publishing. If an author chooses to acquire professional help Reedsy has it. That help comes in a multitude of services. All you need to do is request a service from five professionals out of several, wait for their quotes and pick who fits your needs best. I believe, Reedsy is an endlessly pool of help.

“Our community is home to the best publishing talent on the planet.”

Reedsy

By next month the cover to my book, Jemi’s Noble Quest, will be finished by a Reedsy book cover designer. I connected with her after requesting quotes from five different designers. At first, I was confused which way to go about picking the right fit for me. I prayed. One by one as I reviewed the individuals who I had requested (their bio, samples of their covers and quotes) I decided on the person I felt I could work with the best.

Stay tuned… I’m excited to share more about Reedsy in the weeks ahead. We’re on this adventure together!

Jemi’s Noble Quest

coming soon…

Biblical Fiction Suited for YA and Adult Readers

Sneak Peek: Chapter One

Jemi’s Noble Quest

Photo by Thu Trang on Pexels.com

“Oh, Kenziah, you worry too much.” Jemi looked eagerly about as she continued, “Smell the spices, and enjoy the colors before us. These are our people. This is our home village. Father is respected and honored here. We are descendants of Job, who was one of the wealthiest men of the Syrian Desert! Job was a man of great integrity just like our father. God will provide, as he did in the days of Job. His hand is upon us even in this time of difficulty. You need to have faith, sister.”

  • Who is Jemi?
  • How can Jemi be related to Job?
  • When difficulties come will God really help?

Jemi’s Crimson Shawl & Hints of the Light

A crimson shawl is a life-line to Jemi. Why is Kenziah so protective? What is this mysterious Light? Read the book and find out.

Jemi’s Noble Quest: Coming soon through Amazon Publishing

Editing: Can or Can’t

img_6672-1Editing is like cleaning dishes after you’ve made a gourmet meal. Or sewing the holes in your jeans, you know what generation I am from, instead of working on a new dress project. For me editing is the least favorite part of writing, although, marketing may take a close second.

Some of the things writer’s like are: playing with words, developing plots, and expressing their voice on a topic. I was told a long time ago part of writing is “rewrite, rewrite, and rewrite”. Today we’ll talk about what I have learned on the use of contractions.

In 2007, writersdigest.com stated, “As for novels, short stories and other forms of writing where your own style is required, it’s up to you whether you can, cannot or can’t use them.”

In 2015, Reddit said, “There is no rule.”

In 2016, helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com announced, “…almost everyone commonly uses contraction in almost all forms of communication, writers can hardly avoid contractions in dialogue without sacrificing realism.”

In 2020, louiseharnbyproofreader.com declared, “…we want to write natural dialogue – dialogue that flows with the ease of real-life speech – contractions work.”

So what does YourDictionary.com tell us? “When writing dialogue in a novel or play, contractions help reflect how a character actually speaks.” Some weird contractions are: ain’t, ma’am, ’tis, ’twas, y’all. In other words: is not, madam, it is, it was, and you all.

In closing, as I was writing my son handed me a copy of On Writing Well, by William Zinsser, one million copies sold and the 30th anniversary edition. Don’t I feel special. His comment, “Your style will be warmer and truer to your personality if you use contractions like I’ll and won’t and can’t when they fit comfortably into what you’re writing. ” “There’s no rule against such informality – trust your ear and you instincts.”

This ma’am, is gonna use contractions in her dialogue and may’b in other parts of her story. It ain’t a problem unless one over does’t. All kidding aside, the use of a good contraction at the right time is more than acceptable.

Book Journey: by Patrica Wolf

The day has come. I made the decision. My ten year old manuscript is going to finally take wings and launch!

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After a decade, I woke up one morning this past spring and made the decision to self-publish. Maybe it was the warm spring breeze or the fact the nation had been put in “isolation mode”; to motivate my movement forward to publish. Whatever the reason, my adventure has begun. In appetizer portions I will be sharing the process. Also, dropping hints on the book in the weeks to come.

 

 

 

As Winter Comes

As Winter Comes…

September’s bustling chatter

echoesm throughout the wood.

The drone of slick-back crickets,

whizzing of late cicadas,

and jabbering of sly chipmunks;

resound and ring in humid air.

Hydrangea’s bow bulky, blushing heads

and stately goldenrod glimmers

attracting bustling bumblebees

loading pollen for the making.

Time trickles with all things.

A babe is born and old men die.

September comes…

and goes as geese fly south.

For my father-in-law… May you know the streets of gold where Jesus awaits everyone willing to receive Him as Savior.”

“I will bless the Lord who has given me counsel;

My heart also instructs me in the night seasons.

I have set the Lord always before me;

Because He is at my right hand I shall not be moved.”

Psalm 16:7-8